Russian Money

5000 Russian Rubles Banknote

Russian ruble (or rouble) is the only currency officially accepted in Russia. When you pay for the taxi, buy tickets in public transport, shop in malls and markets, buy tickets to museums and theatres – anywhere you pay in cash you will need rubles.

Russian ruble (rouble) is subdivided into 100 kopecks. The official shortening is RUB, and the Unicode sign is ₽ (U+20BD). Below is the quick guide to Russian currency with pictures.

If you have a bank card by all major international card systems – VISA, MasterCard, American Express, Discover – are accepted in most malls, supermarkets, and a growing number of other businesses. Still, the further inside the country you go the more chances are that you will need cash. Here’s what it looks like.

Russian banknotes

5 Russian Rubles Banknote

5 rubles banknote is practically out of use. You will be lucky to find one – in some antique shops and with collectors. The front of the banknote depicts the monument “Millennium of Russia” and Sophia Cathedral in Veliky Novgorod. The back of the banknote shows the fortress wall of the Novgorod Kremlin.

The banknote has light-green hue. It has local watermarks on the left and right coupon fields; protective fibres of violet, red and light-green colours chaotically embedded in the paper; vertical security thread seen in the transmitted light is embedded in the paper.

10 Russian Rubles Banknote

10 rubles banknote might still be found, but is no longer printed. The front of the banknote depicts the bridge across the Yenisey river and a chapel in Krasnoyarsk. On the back of the banknote you can see the Krasnoyarsk hydroelectric station dam.

Protective fibres of three types are embedded in the paper (red, light-green and two-coloured); metallic window thread is embedded in the paper coming out on the surface on the back of the banknote; there is a field with latent coloured waves on the front of the banknote.

50 Russian Rubles Banknote

50 rubles banknote is quite useful for single purchases of such items is public transport tickets, bread, etc. But due to inflation it is becoming less practical in other situations. The front of the banknote depicts the sculpture at the base of the Rostral Column and the Peter and Paul Fortress in St.Petersburg. On the back of the banknote there is the Stock Exchange and Rostral Column in St. Petersburg.

The predominant colours of the banknote are navy blue and blue. Protective fibres of three types are embedded in the paper (red, light-green and two-coloured) as well as metallic window thread (coming out on the surface on the back of the banknote); there is a field with latent coloured waves on the front of the banknote.

100 Russian Rubles Banknote

100 rubles banknote is the most-widely used – it is not too big for the sake of finding change. The front of the banknote depicts the quadriga above the portico of the Bolshoi Theatre in Moscow. The Bolshoi Theatre building is shown on the back of the banknote.

Predominant colours of the banknote are brown and green. Protective fibres of four types are embedded in the paper (red, light-green, two-coloured and grey) as well as metallic window thread (coming out on the surface on the back of the banknote); there is a field with latent coloured waves on the front of the banknote.

500 Russian Rubles Banknote

500 rubles banknote is getting more practical due to inflation. However, do not use it to pay for a single ticket in public transport (nobody will find you change for that). The front of the banknote shows the monument to Peter the Great and sailing ship in the port of Arkhangelsk. On the back of the banknote you will find Solovetsky monastery.

Predominant colours of the banknote are violet and blue. The emblem of the Bank of Russia is made with optically-variable ink. Security fibres of two types are embedded in the paper (two-coloured and one-coloured grey ones) as well as security thread (coming out on a surface on the front of the banknote in the shape of a window); there is a multitone & highlight watermark on the right unprinted area; there are fine relief line marks on the front of the banknote at the edges of unprinted areas; the height of figures of the left serial number smoothly increases from the left to the right; some elements of the image have magnetic properties.

1000 Russian Rubles Banknote

1000 rubles banknote is now the most widely used for shopping if you pay in cash. The monument to Prince Yaroslav the Wise and chapel on the background of the Yaroslavl Kremlin are on the front of the banknote; while the back depicts the Bell Tower and Church of John the Precursor in Yaroslavl.

Predominant colours of the banknote are blue and green. Security fibres of two types are embedded in the paper (two-coloured and one-coloured grey ones) as well as security thread (coming out on a surface on the front of the banknote in the shape of a window); multitone & highlight watermark is located on the wide unprinted area; the coat-of-arms of the city of Yaroslavl is printed in optically variable magnetic ink (OVMI) with the effect of a moving bright glossy bar (in latest modifications); there are fine relief line marks on the front of the banknote at the edges of unprinted areas; there is an area with constantly visible coloured waves at the bottom of a field with latent coloured waves; the height of figures of the left serial number smoothly increases from the left to the right; some elements of the image have magnetic properties.

5000 Russian Rubles Banknote

5000 rubles banknote is rarely seen in every-day shopping unless you buy expensive things, pay in an upscale restaurant or for accommodation in a hotel. The front of the banknote depicts the monument to Nikolay Muravjov-Amursky and the embankment in Khabarovsk. On the back of the banknote you will find the bridge over the Amur River in Khabarovsk.

Main colours of the banknote are red and brown. Security fibres of two types are embedded in the paper (two-coloured and one-coloured grey ones); a wide security thread is embedded and comes out on a surface on the front of the banknote in the shape of a window; there is a multitone & highlight watermark on the right unprinted area; the coat-of-arms of the city of Khabarovsk is printed in optically variable magnetic ink with the effect of a moving bright glossy bar; there are fine relief line marks on the front of the banknote at the edges of unprinted areas; there is an area with constantly visible coloured stripes at the bottom of a field with latent coloured stripes; the height of figures of the left serial number smoothly increases from the left to the right; some elements of the image have magnetic properties.

Russian Coins

All coins are disk-shaped. 1 and 5 kopecks coins as well as 1, 2, and 5 rubles coins are white in colour, while 10 and 50 kopecks coins, as well as 10 rubles coins are yellow in colour.

1 and 5 kopecks coins are practically out of use. They are legally accepted and sometimes this might make all the difference when paying in shops, but some supermarkets now cut the bills accordingly because no one will find the necessary coins in their wallets. 10 and 50 kopecks coins are slightly more useful.

1 Russian Kopecks Coin  5 Russian Kopecks Coin

1, 2, 5 and 10 rubles coins are quite useful for small sums and change. 10 rubles coin has almost displaced the 10 rubles banknote in circulation, while 5 ruble coin killed the 5 ruble banknote a long time ago.

10 Russian Kopecks Coin  50 Russian Kopecks Coin

The obverse (front) of all kopeck coins depicts the relief image of Saint George the Warrior on horseback killing a serpent with a spear in the centre of the coin, the inscription “БАНК РОССИИ” (BANK OF RUSSIA) along the top rim, and the year of mint at the bottom.

The reverse (back) of all kopeck coins depicts the denomination of the coin, and the stylized vegetable ornament in form of two branches.

1 Russian Rubles Coin  2 Russian Rubles Coin

1, 2, 5, and 10 rubles coins come in two versions that differ by the obverse of the coin. There is a relief image of the two-headed eagle in the centre in the old version, and the image of the National Coat of Arms of the Russian Federation (the same two-headed eagle but with crowns, orb and sceptre). The old version had the coin denomination at the top, the inscription “БАНК РОССИИ” (BANK OF RUSSIA) and year of mint at the bottom. The new 2016 version has the same inscription at the bottom, and the words “РОССИЙСКАЯ ФЕДЕРАЦИЯ” (RUSSIAN FEDERATION) at the top.

5 Russian Rubles Coin  10 Russian Rubles Coin

The reverse of the ruble coins have the denomination of the coin in the centre, and the stylized vegetable ornament in form of two interwoven branches below along the rim and on the right part of the disc. Inside of the figure “0” there are hidden pictures — the figure “10” and the inscription “РУБ” visible by turns on changing the angle of vision.

There are a lot of commemorative versions of the 10-rouble coin that still have the same denomination and are accepted without reservations.

Any comments?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s